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Art Subject Overview


“I have come that they may have life and they may have it to the full”

John 10:10

Statement of Intent

The curriculum at St Mary’s Art Department is holistic, covers the National Curriculum and is designed to embody the Catholic ethos of St Mary’s offering challenge within a caring and supportive community environment in which all students have the opportunity to thrive and achieve. It is designed to provide all students, particularly the most disadvantaged and those with special educational needs and or disabilities (SEND ) or high needs, the knowledge and cultural capital they need to succeed in life. We aim to provide and environment in which students are happy to take risks, ask themselves about their creative journeys and respond positively to staff and their peers.

Our Art and Design curriculum has been collaboratively designed to provide our students with both the practical skills and knowledge needed to make a successful transition to the next stage of their life. It is our intent that our curriculum is a journey exploring and responding to the formal elements which underpin our lessons and schemes.

Literacy is essential and embedded within elements of our curriculum. Students have opportunities to harness their literacy skills and are regularly encouraged to engage in discussion, written and verbal analysis and evaluation of the work of other practitioners and that of their peers.

Visual literacy skills are essential for children to learn, especially in today’s media and technology driven world. With an increasing amount of imagery and technology available to our students in and out of art lessons, these skills are more imperative. Today’s extensive internet and media use means that visuals are frequently warped or misrepresented, meaning that a higher degree of visual literacy is required to effectively translate our ever-changing environment.

We aim for students at St Mary’s to leave us with an educated perception of imagery and to teach our students to be sceptical and informed viewers of all visual media. By ensuring our students are visually literate we are arming them with life skills that assist them to make reasonable and intelligent sense of what they see around them.

We aim to enthuse and engage our students by creating exciting projects with clear links to topical and global issues which are of interest to our students.

Exploring historical, modern and contemporary art is fundamental to our schemes in addition to exploring ethical, social and economic power of art. We have discovered that students learn best by initially learning factual information, followed by creating their own art work in response to what they have seen and discovered.

We encourage conversation, discussion, critique and debate about students’ own work and that of other artists, designers and photographers. We have discovered that this is effective in extending our students knowledge of artistic concepts and principles alongside developing the appropriate language for discussing works of art and design.

Art is a universal subject that can transcend geography, history, culture, race and creed. The world is full of the treasures of Art and any of them are “visually” accessible, if not logistically so. Any work of art can inform us of the cultural context in which it was created and reinforce what it means to be human. Like any cultural discipline there are numerous skills and approaches which are encountered, to not only enable a deeper engagement with Art from a studying viewpoint, but also as that of an aspiring practitioner. We encourage engagement with materials in a wide range of ways: from the rudimentary to the complex. Students are instructed and encouraged to develop persistence and resilience, hone techniques, explore their imagination and trust their observations. They learn how to record, develop, experiment, connect, present and communicate verbally and visually when making their art as well as experiencing opportunities to work collaboratively, further harnessing skills ready for the 21st century workplace.

Art is sometimes used as a vehicle for other issues and feelings but at its purest and most ambitious it exists as an autonomous reality that is engaged with visually and interrogated intellectually as a consequence of this engagement. Students are encouraged to communicate their observations, imagination, feelings and personal experiences and learn about other cultures. Artwork is displayed and celebrated regularly allowing students to take a pride in their achievements which also develops their confidence as individuals as well and encouraging respect for the community environment.

The ethos of our curriculum aims to develop the whole person; students become more spiritually, culturally and creatively aware. They become more resourceful, aware of global issues and challenges faced by practising artists, designers and craftspeople and those of the future.

Developing cultural capital of our students by providing them with a means to engage with and understand the world around them and their relationship with it is one of our strengths. Embedded within our curriculum is the exploration of the work of other artists and designers from a spectrum of genders, ethnicities and beliefs. As there is a predominantly White British population in the catchment area in Blackpool, we believe that it is important to raise cultural awareness through art and this is developed through exposure and discussion.

We believe that all students can achieve, regardless of cultural or economic background. All students are provided with all of the necessary materials and access to equipment for their classwork and home learning, are encouraged and supported in class and are offered regular extracurricular opportunities.

For the Student the department aims to:

  1. Provide courses which are relevant to the students' experience and ability. 
  2. Provide a classroom environment which is stimulating, pleasant and disciplined. 
  3. Promote good study methods and habits. 
  4. Develop persistence and resilience. 
  5. Develop visual literacy skills. 
  6. Develop an art and design based vocabulary. 
  7. Develop an awareness of art and design throughout history and in other cultures.

For the Academy the department aims to:

  1. Contribute fully to the day-to-day running of the Academy. 
  2. Contribute to decision-making within the Academy.
  3. Develop cross-curricular links and make the department accessible to everyone. 
  4. Be up to date with subject developments.
  5. Be up to date with general developments in education.
  6. Enhance the academy environment with artwork.

Art & Design

In Art and Design, students are encouraged to build and develop skills they have acquired at KS2. Students work on a series of project-based learning assignments which gear students towards skills they need to succeed at GCSE level Art, Photography, Textiles, Art, Craft and Design or 3 Dimensional; explore and develop ideas, record observations, investigating and making, evaluating and developing work, understanding concepts and ideas relative to the work of other artists, designers and craftspeople.

During all project work, students are encouraged to view and research the work of other traditional, modern and contemporary artists, sculptors, illustrators and designers relating to given themes. In Art and Design, students are encouraged to create initial work in a sketchbook in order to develop larger scale works as a visual conclusion to their creative assignments. During KS3 students are encouraged to view Art and Design in the context of the wider world.

Currently all students study art during year 7 and 8 and they have the option to study art in year 9. Students can then opt to study Art and Design subjects in year 10 and 11. Students can then opt to study Art and Design subjects we offer at A Level - Graphic Communications, Fine Art and Photography.

KS3 Art & Design

Students complete the following comprehensive programme:

Year 7

Course Content

In Year 7, students acquire skills in the use of a variety of artistic medium, learn research skills, gain in depth knowledge of colour theory. Artistic skills acquired are applied to work created during the year.

Year 7 themes include:
Following an introduction to the formal elements in art and design and colour theory, students engage in projects based upon “The Natural and Built Environment” - Students are encouraged to develop work based upon the natural world, rural landscape and architecture. Students experience art from movements such as Pop Art, Fauvism and Impressionism.

“Self-Image”- Students develop observational and creative drawing skills and introduced to codes and conventions of portraits throughout history.

During all project work, students are encouraged to view and research the work of other traditional and contemporary artists, sculptors, illustrators and designers relating to given themes. Students are encouraged to create initial work in a booklet in order to develop larger scale works as a visual conclusion to their creative assignments.

Year 8

Course Content

Students in year 8 build upon and apply skills acquired throughout Year 7 in project-based work developed during Year 8.

Year 8 themes include:
“Objects and Viewpoints”, in which students develop primary observational, mark making painting and basic photographic skills. Students gain an understanding of how styles of Art and Design have changed over the years and how culture, politics and society has had an influence on Art and Design styles into the 21st Century. Students explore artists from Dutch Vanitas, the Art Movements, Post- Impressionism and Cubism as well as exploring contemporary art work from artists such as Michael Craig -Martin and Audrey Flack.

“Signs and Symbols in Society and in other Cultures” - students develop an understanding and interpretation of codes, conventions and symbols used to communicate thoughts ideas, cultural and religious beliefs. They create a visual response to the theme of symbols. Students experience work from Asian, European, Islamic and African Cultures and explore culturally inspired works of art.

Year 9

Course Content

Students in year 9 have an opportunity to refine their artistic skills and there is an emphasis on contextual based studies and the creation of imagery in larger scale.

Year 9 themes include:
“Narrative Art” in which students study and analyse key historical pieces of narrative work and how art is used to communicate thoughts, ideas emotions and represent micro, macro and meso events. They learn to understand and appreciate the function of Public Art. Students create highly personal responses to own life events and those events which have made history.

“A practical introduction to the artistic medium”. Students develop drawing, painting, mixed media and photographic skills and experience a series of experimental workshops informed by contextual sources as an introduction to the skills they would need to draw upon in preparation for study in art and design subjects at Key Stage 4.

KS4 Art & Design

Students address and are assessed on four main areas of enquiry which are linked to and extend on the assessment criteria in KS3. Artist research and analysis (AO1), artistic competency in a variety of media (AO3), development of ideas based on prior research (AO2), and personal response both written and visual (AO4). These four inter-related assessment objectives are used to build the knowledge and skills required for artist appreciation and practice. The GCSE scheme aims to build on the complexity of art and materials, and skills and knowledge, while beginning to challenge and expand on students’ ability to work independently and identify their own artistic style and voice.

The Department aims to make art accessible to all students opting to study a varied curriculum offer at Key Stage 4 to cultivate a sense of enjoyment and cultural awareness in all our students through the study of carefully planned and structured projects. Our aim is to foster the development of every student whilst encouraging and nurturing the desire in our students to produce work of high calibre.

We teach a wide range of disciplines to students across all key stages which include drawing, painting, printmaking, photoshop manipulation, textiles, 3 dimensional studies, art, craft and design and photography.

All students are provided with the opportunity to follow a challenging, supportive and varied learning programme to suit their individual needs. All of our students who vary in ability level are given the opportunity to experience a wide range of themes, topics, media and processes that are underpinned by contextual investigation and understanding and to create highly individual responses.

KS5 Art & Design

The suite of Art and Design subjects offered at A Level are Fine Art, Graphic Communication and Photography.

Students are introduced to a variety of experiences that explore a range of fine art, photographic and graphic media, processes and techniques. They are made aware of both traditional and new media. Students explore the use of drawing for different purposes, using a variety of methods and media on a variety of scales. Students use sketchbooks/workbooks/journals to underpin their work where appropriate. Students explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art and design, photographic and graphics from the past and from recent times, including European and non-European examples. This is integral to the investigating and making processes. Students' responses to these examples are shown through practical and critical activities that demonstrate their understanding of different styles, genres and traditions.

Students are be aware of the four assessment objectives to be demonstrated in the context of the content and skills presented. They are made aware of the importance of process as well as product. Students address and are assessed on four main areas of enquiry which are linked to and extend on the assessment criteria in KS4. In depth artist research and analysis (AO1), artistic competency in a variety of media (AO3), development of ideas based on prior research (AO2), and personal response both written and visual (AO4). These four inter-related assessment objectives are used to build the knowledge and skills required for artist appreciation and practice. The A Level curriculum aims to build on the complexity of art and materials, and skills and knowledge, while beginning to challenge and expand on students’ ability to work independently and identify their individual style and voice, harnessing independent and collaborative work, presentational skills, resilience, the proficiency in industry based software, research and analytical skills as well as competency.

Students are exposed to creative career opportunities and where appropriate, galleries and workshops with practitioners.

  • Graphic Communication

    Graphics A-Level is the process of visual communication and problem-solving through the use of type, space and image. Graphic Design is all around us – the packaging we use, lettering, illustration, labels and brands that we see every day.

    We provide art packs at cost price (for KS4/5) and have financial support options available for families in hardship. We strive to ensure that all work is accessible and that no student is in any way disadvantaged from accessing the curriculum on their terms, within the syllabus framework guidelines.

    At KS4 and KS5, students are also given the opportunity to experience works of art first hand. We place great importance on educational visits and believe that these opportunities enhance and enrich students' learning whilst also inspiring them in their own practice. In previous years we have taken students to The Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool, The Tate Gallery, Liverpool and The Walker Gallery, Manchester.

    In order to provide an environment in which learning can take place and to develop courses which are relevant, the department has set out aims with respect to the student, the Academy and the council.

  • Fine Art

    Fine Art A-Level is the making and study of visual art such as painting, printmaking and sculpture. The course covers a variety of different processes and skills, which can be developed on a specialist art and design degree course. Analytical and observational skills can be utilised in a wide range of creative environments.

  • Photography

    The Digital Photography A-Level is a way of visually recording, documenting and presenting both the ordinary and extraordinary. It is often considered an art form, an aspect of self-expressionism, a journalistic process or even an aspect of visual culture. This is a practical subject, combined with in-depth photographic theory and art history.

Art Curriculum Map

Year 7 Art Overview
In year 7, students engage with 3 thematic enquiries: Colour Theory, The Environment; natural environment: Landscapes and Architecture. Through these themes, students are introduced to the formal elements of art and their foundation vocabularies. This vocabulary allows students to describe, evaluate and express an opinion on works of art, craft and design.
Year 7 Art Topics
  • Autumn Term

    In the Autumn term students learn the importance of formal elements of art, craft and design.

    Enquiry Question: What is Art?

    Knowledge Content:

    Formal Elements: line, shape, tone, form, colour, texture, pattern
    Context: Henri Matisse, Andy Warhol, Vincent Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso Blue Period
    Processes: drawing, painting, mark making, pastel, coloured pencil
    Vocabulary: colour, primary, secondary, tertiary, harmonious, complementary, hot, cold, tint, shade, tone, hue.

    Skills of Designing and Developing Ideas
    Record from primary and secondary sources, design for 2D outcomes, small experimental studies, annotation.

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate and express an opinion about visual images, arts and students work, use descriptive and critical language, use specialist language of discourse to express views and interpretations.

    Link to Prior Learning
    Builds on using workbooks and sketchbooks as a creative tool, used to gather, collect, experiment and reflect.

  • Lent Term

    In the Lent term, students gain an understanding of colour theory and how artists within in Impressionism, Fauvism and Pointillism used colour to respond to their surrounding landscapes.

    Enquiry Question: How and why do artists use colour?

    Knowledge Content:

    Formal Elements: texture, colour
    Context: Impressionism (1865-1885), Claude Monet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Pointillism (1880’s – 1890’s), Georges Seurat, Fauvism (1900-1935), Andre Derain and Henri Matisse
    Processes: drawing, photography, painting use of round and flat headed brushes, paper cutting
    Vocabulary: colour, primary, secondary, tertiary, harmonious, complementary, hot, cold, tint, shade, tone, hue, observation, emotion, gesture, movement, perspective, mood, transcription, Abstract, composition, texture, mark making, actual texture, implied texture, impression, positive and negative space.

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate and express an opinion about visual images, artists and students work, use descriptive and critical language, use specialist language of discourse to express views and interpretations.

    Skills of Designing and Developing Ideas
    Record from primary and secondary sources, annotation, control the selection and interpretation of elements from artists studied, planning a proposed outcome.

    Link to Prior Learning
    Builds on students’ knowledge of texture and skill using mark making, colour mixing and Colour Theory.

  • Summer Term

    In the Summer term, students will study their built environment and produce perspective images in a range of media and using a range of processes.

    Enquiry Question: How have artists responded to and impacted upon the world?

    Knowledge Content:

    Formal Elements: Line, colour, shape, form
    Context: Architectural styles, Gothic, Tudor, Charles Sheeler, Luke O’ Sullivan, Barnaby Bradford, Antonia Dewhurst, Nina Lindgren, Michael C. McMillen, Eric Cremers.
    Processes: drawing, sculpture, print making.
    Vocabulary: perspective, horizon, orthogonal, vertical, horizontal, space, urban, cityscape, symmetry.

    Skills of Designing and Developing Idea
    Record from primary and secondary sources; design for 2D and 3D outcomes; thumbnail studies; annotation, research; maquettes and prototypes; follow a sequence of design steps.

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work; adapt and refine choices and actions; discuss different aspects of own and others work; explain how to refine ideas, skills and methods; compare, analyse and describe different ideas and approaches used by artists; recognise influence of context, culture and time.

    Link to Prior Learning
    Builds on knowledge of perspective, use of colour, colour mixing, Colour Theory.

Year 8 Art Overview
In Year 7, students have acquired the knowledge of the formal elements and their breadth of application using a wide range of materials and processes. In Year 8, students explore the codes and conventions of still life and Art from other cultures. The depth of this knowledge grows across the three thematic enquiries; Objects and Viewpoints (Still Life), Multiple Viewpoints and Signs and Symbols. Students build on their foundation vocabulary, as they compare and analyse visual concepts they study in context to culture and time.
Year 8 Art Topics
  • Autumn Term

    Students visit core drawing skills in the autumn term learning the principles of proportion, scale, line tone and texture Students learn about codes and conventions in still life and how this is represented in art.

    Enquiry Question: How have Artists represented objects within Art Objects and Viewpoints

    Knowledge Content:

    Formal Elements: line, tone, shape, form, texture, colour,
    Context: Dutch Vanitas, Post Impressionism (Van Gogh) Cubism, Still Life Photography (Edward Weston, Imogen Cunningham) Pop Art (Lichtenstein and Michael Craig Martin)Audrey Flack
    Processes: Drawing measuring, scaling use of viewfinders,
    Vocabulary: viewpoint, composition, geometric, representation, interpretation, abstraction, tradition, codes, conventions, perspective, colour, primary, secondary, tertiary, harmonious, complementary, hot, cold, tint, shade, tone, hue, transcription, foreground, background, positive / negative space

    Skills of Making Art, Craft and Design

    Materials: pencil, pen/ biro fine liner, charcoal, block paint, collage paper
    Techniques: layered shading, collage, linear pen work, mix and apply colour, wet and dry painting techniques

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions.

  • Lent Term

    In this term students gain confidence in their colour mixing and tonal application techniques in response to still life compositions and Cubist artists.

    Enquiry Question: Why do artists challenge conventions?

    Multiple Viewpoints

    Knowledge Content:

    Formal Elements: line, tone, texture, colour, shape, form
    Context: Edward Collier, Cubism (1907 -1914), Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris
    Processes: drawing, painting
    Vocabulary: viewpoint, composition, geometric, representation, Fragmented, distorted, broken, interpretation, abstraction, tradition, codes, conventions, perspective, colour, primary, secondary, tertiary, harmonious, complementary, hot, cold, tint, shade, tone, hue, transcription 

    Threshold Concepts
    Artists use and abuse traditions 

    Link to Prior Learning
    Builds on traditional still life conventions and revisits painting techniques

    Skills of Making Art, Craft and Design

    Materials: pencil, block paint, collage paper, cardboard
    Techniques: layered shading, collage, cardboard construction, mix and apply colour, wet and dry painting techniques

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions.

  • Summer Term

    In this term students develop an understanding and interpretation of the conventions, codes and symbols used to communicate thoughts ideas and cultural and religious beliefs.

    Enquiry Question: Why do Artists feature signs, symbols colours within art and design work?

    Signs and Symbols
    Knowledge content:

    Formal Elements: line, tone, texture, colour, shape, form, pattern
    Context: Asian, European, Islamic and African Cultures and explore culturally inspired works of art.
    Processes: Drawing, painting, printmaking sgraffitto, pastel print making, mark making techniques, collage
    Vocabulary: Composition, repetition, motif, symbol, representation, symmetry, asymmetry, tradition, code, convention,

    Threshold Concepts
    Artists use design / colour / traditions to convey, represent ideas, thoughts, Cultural / religious beliefs

    Link to Prior Learning
    Builds on knowledge of why artists use tradition and challenge convention in art and design. This project revisits painting and drawing techniques

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions.

Year 9 Art Overview

In Year 8, students gain their knowledge of the codes and conventions in art. Students also developed skills in judgement and evaluation to be able to adapt and refine their work and recognise the influence of context and time. In year 9, students use their understanding of codes, conventions, genres, styles and traditions to inform their own judgments and strengthen their artwork. Students will increase their proficiency in handling different materials and purposefully use tools and techniques across the three varying thematic enquiries; Narrative Art, Propaganda, Natural Forms.

Year 9 Art Topics
  • Autumn Term

    In this Term students are introduced to Art and photography as a powerful narrative tool, an appreciation of Public Art and are aware of contexts in which narrative art / sculpture can occur.

    Enquiry Question:  what role do artists/ photographers play in recording events?

    Narrative Art

    Knowledge Content: 

    Formal Elements: Line, tone, texture, colour, shape, form, pattern.
    Context:  Greek Narrative Art, Medici, William Hogarth, Jan Van Eyck, War Artists  John Nash, CRW Nevinson, (Picasso’s Guernica) Grayson Perry. Responses to War Poetry Seigfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen.
    Processes: drawing,  coloured pencil, small sketches, researching, planning and designing
    Vocabulary : composition, imagery, narrative, social class, motif, representation, symbolism, social history, personal, micro, macro, meso events

    Threshold Concepts
    Art can represent events both positive and negative. Art can inform people of events

    Link to prior learning
    Motifs/ images have meaning within different cultures, colour and pattern can symbolise meanings, moods or represent beliefs.

    Skills of Designing and Developing Ideas
    Record from primary and secondary sources; design for 2D and 3D outcomes; thumbnail studies; annotation, research; maquettes and prototypes

    Skills of Making Art, Craft and Design

    Materials: pencil, fine liner, ink, block paint, card, paper / collage
    Techniques: a wide range of descriptive and different types of line, mix and apply colour, wet and dry painting techniques, composition, site specific awareness

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions

  • Lent Term (until Feb half term)

    In this term, students examine the powerful role of objects and images in movements for social change. Students produce objects and images to communicate beliefs/ ideas and protest. 

    Enquiry Question: How does art make people/institutions/ideas powerful?

    Protest and Propaganda

    How is Art used as propaganda?

    Knowledge Content: 

    Formal Elements: Line, tone, texture, colour, shape, form
    Context: Jean-Michel Basquiat, Shepard Fairey, Guerrilla Girls, Soviet Union propaganda, Chinese dissident artists, editorial/political/satirical illustration
    Processes: drawing, painting, installation
    Vocabulary: editorial illustration, commission, satirical, graphic, propaganda, dissidence, manifesto, protest, performance, installation, collective, degenerate, transformative, socially engaged practice

    Threshold Concepts
    Art makes people powerful, for good and bad

    Link to Prior Learning
    Revisit art as a language and revisits all formal elements

    Skills of Designing and Developing Ideas
    Record from primary and secondary sources; design for 2D and 3D outcomes; thumbnail studies; annotation, research; maquettes and prototypes.

    Skills of Making Art, Craft and Design 

    Materials: pencil, fine liner, ink, block paint, card, paper
    Techniques: a wide range of descriptive and different types of line, mix and apply colour, wet and dry painting techniques, installation composition, site specific awareness.

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions.

  • From February half term to Summer

    In this term, students examine how artists have represented natural forms in art and photography. Students extend their skills in observational drawing and use of  artistic medium

    Enquiry question: How have artists represented Natural Forms ?

    Knowledge Content:

    Formal Elements: Line, tone, texture, colour, shape, form
    Context: Edward Weston, Imogen Cunningham, Georgia O Keefe, Vincent Van Gogh, Justin Franca villa, Beatriz Milhazes. Iain Macarthur. 
    Processes: Layered tone, charcoal, pastel, ink and wash, coloured pencil, mosaic / collaging
    Vocabulary: viewpoint, composition, geometric,  representation, interpretation, abstraction, tradition, codes, conventions, perspective, colour, primary, secondary, tertiary, harmonious, complementary, hot, cold, tint, shade, tone, hue, transcription, foreground, background, positive / negative space

    Threshold concepts
    Art can be realistic or representational

    Skills of Designing and Developing Ideas
    Record from primary and secondary sources; design for 2D and 3D outcomes; thumbnail studies; annotation, research; maquettes and prototypes.

    Skills of Making Art, Craft and Design

    Materials: pencil, fine liner, ink, block paint, card, paper
    Techniques: a wide range of descriptive and different types of line, mix and apply colour, wet and dry painting techniques, composition, site specific awareness.

    Skills of Judgement and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions.

KS4 Fine Art Overview
Students address and are assessed on four main areas of enquiry which are linked to and extend on the assessment criteria in KS3. The criteria followed form foundations of projects and skills covered as et out by AQA Art and Design Specifications; Artist research and analysis (AO1), artistic competency in a variety of media (AO3), development of ideas based on prior research (AO2), and personal response both written and visual (AO4). These four inter-related assessment objectives are used to build the knowledge and skills required for artist appreciation and practice. The GCSE scheme aims to build on the complexity of art and materials, and skills and knowledge, while beginning to challenge and expand on students’ ability to work independently and identify their own artistic style and voice.
Year 10 Fine Art Topics
  • September to October

    Introduction to course covering examples of coursework and appropriate theme development. (AO1,AO3) 

    Development of Formal Elements
    line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture
    Processes
    Students explore a range of artistic techniques and processes that they will include within their personal theme. This is achieved via a workshop delivery in order to practice and renew appropriate skills and techniques. Students learn how to record ideas, document and create work within a folder.
    Context:
    Teacher discretion and preferred artistic references, Still Life examples, Dutch Vanitas, Audrey Flack, Paul  Cezanne 
    Vocabulary:
    Formal elements, Composition, analysis.
    Techniques / processes:
    Students explore a range of techniques and processes that they will include within their personal theme. This is achieved via a workshop delivery in order to practice and renew appropriate skills and techniques.
    Links to prior learning:
    Knowledge of Colour Theory, composition, Practical techniques.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others

  • October to April

    Students respond to the theme of Still Life and use appropriate influences to support a personal investigation. (AO1,AO2,AO3)

    Subtheme Enquiry question – STILL LIFE – Dutch Vanitas

    Students focus on developing observational studies based on a subtheme inspired by the “Dutch Vanitas”) Students will work from a range of primary and Secondary sources.

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme – investigation into the work of AUDREY FLACK, DUTCH VANITAS

    AO2
    Refine ideas using a variety of techniques relevant to own theme as directed by staff. Experimenting with materials/ methods, techniques and processes in response to own chosen theme, refining ideas as they develop.

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation studies relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate and analyse own work and that of chosen influences. 

    Context: 
    Paul Cezanne, Dutch Vanitas, Audrey Flack
    Vocabulary: 
    Formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Composition, Scale,
    Techniques / processes:
    Pencil, pen, Monoprint, collage, paint ,Photoshop, Multi Media

    Links to prior learning
    Knowledge of Formal elements, Colour theory, Composition, Scale

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • April to July

    Students continue to respond to theme/subtheme and explore appropriate ideas. Students select individual response leading to a final concluding piece (AO4)

    Subtheme Enquiry question – STILL LIFE – Dutch Vanitas

    Students focus on developing studies based on a subtheme inspired by their AO1 artist influences. Students work towards a final and concluding image/series of work.

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme – investigation into the work of AUDREY FLACK, DUTCH VANITAS

    AO2
    Create a further series of experimental studies and refine ideas using a variety of influences relevant to own theme as directed by staff Image selection for editing, development and refining.

    AO3
    Student’s record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation studies relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate observational studies effectively. AO4 – develop composition ideas, create conclusive response to project making connections with relevant contextual sources developed throughout the developmental journey.

    Context:
    Paul Cezanne, Dutch Vanitas, Audrey Flack
    Vocabulary:
    Formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Composition, Scale
    Techniques / processes:
    Pencil, pen, Monoprint, collage, paint ,Photoshop – Multi Media
    Links to prior learning:
    Knowledge of Formal elements, Colour theory, Composition, Scale

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

Year 11 Fine Art Topics
  • September to December

    Students respond to the theme of PORTRAITURE and use appropriate influences to support a personal investigation. (AO1,AO2,AO3)

    Subtheme Enquiry question – PORTRAITURE

    Students focus on developing observational studies based on an individual subtheme. Students will work from a range of primary and Secondary sources.

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme – investigation into the work of appropriate portraiture artists.

    AO2
    Refine ideas using a variety of techniques relevant to own theme as directed by staff. Experimenting with materials/ methods, techniques and processes in response to own chosen theme, refining ideas as they develop.

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation studies relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate and analyse own work and that of chosen influences.

    Context:
    LUCIEN FREUD,MARK POWELL, FLORIEN NICOLE, IAN MCARTHUR
    Vocabulary:
    Formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Composition, Scale.
    Techniques / processes:
    Pencil, pen, Monoprint, collage, paint ,Photoshop, Multi Media
    Links to prior Learning Knowledge:
    of Formal elements, Colour theory, Composition, Scale

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • December to January

    Students continue to respond to theme/subtheme and explore appropriate ideas. Students select individual response leading to a final concluding piece (AO4).

    Externally set project as set by examination board AQA. Students focus on developing a mini portfolio of work Component 2 in response to ONE of the externally suggested titles on the examination paper.

    Subtheme Enquiry question – PORTRAITURE

    Students focus on developing studies based on a subtheme inspired by their

    AO1
    Artist influences. Students work towards a final and concluding image/series of work. Subject Knowledge and skills AO1 Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme – investigation into the work of selected artists.

    AO2
    Create a further series of experimental studies and refine ideas using a variety of influences relevant to own theme as directed by staff Image selection for editing, development and refining.

    AO3
    Student’s record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation studies relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate observational studies effectively.

    AO4
    Develop composition ideas, create conclusive response to project making connections with relevant contextual sources developed throughout the developmental journey

    Context:
    LUCIEN FREUD,MARK POWELL, FLORIEN NICOLE, IAN MCARTHUR

    Skills of Judgement, Analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • Summer Term

    Summer Term until the beginning of May. Students continue to finalise developmental work in preparation for a 10 hour controlled examination.

    Subject knowledge and skills

    AO2
    Students carry out further refinement of ideas inspired by their chosen artistic sources. Research and practice techniques to be refined during practical examination.

    AO4
    Plans / drawings/ notes to design a conclusive response to own chosen theme To plan, design and prepare conclusive outcome in stages.

    Practical examination (10 hour period over 2 days)

    Following examination Students create a personal, written response to chosen theme containing written analysis and evaluation of practical experiments.

    Links to prior learning Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO use of vocabulary and structure of shooting logs, how to present and annotate contact sheets clearly, studio lighting techniques, editing techniques, how to analyse, evaluate the work of others and to critically analyse own work.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.


Photography Curriculum Map

KS4 Photography Overview

Students address and are assessed on four main areas of enquiry which are linked to and extend on the assessment criteria in KS3. The criteria followed form foundations of projects and skills covered as et out by AQA Art and Design Specifications; Artist research and analysis, technical elements (AO1), artistic competency in a variety of media and visual analysis (AO3), development of ideas based on prior research (AO2), and personal response both written and visual (AO4). These four inter-related assessment objectives are used to build the knowledge and skills required for artistic / photographic appreciation and practice. The GCSE scheme aims to build on the complexity of art, photography and materials, and skills and knowledge, ability to control and manipulate light to create effects while beginning to challenge and expand on students’ ability to work independently and identify their own artistic style and voice.

Year 10 Photography Topics
  • Autumn Term to February Half Term

    Introduction to photography covering the basic introduction to digital photography composition, image capture and more technical aspects of photography covering Aperture, shutter speed, ISO and white balance.

    Enquiry question – what is photography?

    Formal elements:
    line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Subject knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Students learn and research into; What is photography? Formal elements of photography Types of photography Basic composition rules used within photography Students learn how to record ideas and document and create work within a sketchbook.

    AO3
    Basics of image capture/ observation using composition rules (close ups, MACRO photography, silhouettes) Mind mapping themes (The environment) How construct shooting logs to explain ideas / purpose of photographic shoots How to annotate contact sheets and to present these clearly.

    AO2
    Basics of image manipulation / editing Context: Teacher discretion and preferred photographic references, Andy Small, Edward Weston, Imogen Cunningham, Jim Zuckerman, Peter James

    Vocabulary:
    Formal elements, Composition, aperture, shutter speed, white balance, macro photography, long shutter speed, ISO, silhouette, positive/ negative space.
    Techniques / processes:
    Use of digital camera and scanner to create images.
    Links to prior learning:
    Knowledge of Colour Theory, composition, positive / negative space

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • February Half Term to Easter

    Students work to apply skills they have acquired and begin more in depth study work based on thematic work based on how photographers represent their surroundings.

    Subtheme

    Enquiry question – how do photographers represent nature / their surroundings?

    Formal elements:
    line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture.

    Students focus on a creating experimental work based on a subtheme to extend on successful observational work carried out in Autumn term(“Natural forms” OR “Silhouettes”)

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme Natural Forms or Silhouettes,

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation shoots relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate photoshoots and experimental images effectively.

    AO2
    Create experimental photographic work and refine ideas using a variety of photographic techniques relevant to own theme as directed by staff Image selection for editing and development / further experimentation.

    AO4
    develop composition ideas, create conclusive response to project making connections with relevant contextual sources developed throughout the developmental journey.

    Context:
    (Andy Small, Imogen Cunningham, Edward Weston close ups, low key photographers, Claudia Curici, Peter James or Jim Zuckerman (silhouettes) Emma Davies, Irving Penn for High Key Photography.
    Vocabulary:
    Formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Aperture, shutter speed, ISO overexposed, underexposed, macro, foreground / background, High dynamic range, low dynamic range, High Key, Low Key.
    Techniques / processes:
    high key, low key, scanography, collaging, photomontage, use of Photoshop / Pixlr/ Photopea to create effects.
    Links to prior learning:
    Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • Easter to Summer Term

    Students are introduced to studio photographic techniques featured within portraiture photography and work to create experimental work using measured lighting techniques.

    Portraiture

    Enquiry question – how do photographers represent portraits in photography?

    Formal elements:
    line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Students are introduced to portraiture photography and how studio photography basic lighting set ups work.

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to Portraiture photographers, historical and contemporary What is portraiture photography? Composition rules in portraiture photography and their symbolic meanings / hidden messages/ interpretations)

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation shoots relative to portraiture.

    AO2
    Create experimental photographic work using a variety of photographic techniques relevant to Portraiture (use of composition rules experiments in high and low key and use of coloured gels within studio photography) Students acquire further skills to annotate photoshoots and experimental images effectively.

    Context:
    David Bailey and Ian Rankin (high key) Steve Pyke (low key, Jake Hicks (use of coloured gels )
    Vocabulary:
    formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Aperture, shutter speed, ISO overexposed, underexposed, macro, foreground / background, High dynamic range, low dynamic range, High Key, Low Key Light Modifiers : Barn Doors, Light diffuser, light reflector, snoot, honeycomb.
    Techniques / processes:
    high, low and mid key photography Links to prior learning Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO use of vocabulary and structure of shooting logs, how to present and annotate contact sheets clearly.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

Year 11 Photography Topics
  • Autumn Term

    Students work to continue developmental work based on a subtheme within the areas of portraiture photography. Students focus on a creating experimental work based on a subtheme to extend on successful observational work carried out in summer term of year 10: Portraiture subtheme are: colour and mood or reflections)

    Formal elements:
    line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme Colour and mood or Reflections.

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation shoots relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate photoshoots and experimental images effectively.

    AO2
    Create experimental photographic work and refine ideas using a variety of photographic techniques (high key low key, use of props, stage make up, mirrors reflective surfaces as appropriate) relevant to own theme as directed by staff Image selection for editing and development / further experimentation.

    AO4
    Creating a personal, conclusive and written response to the theme of Portraiture, making connections with relevant Artists / designers / photographers to inform practical work.

    To plan, design, prepare and complete conclusive outcome in stages

    Context:
    (David Bailey, Ian Rankin Steve Pyke, Jack Davison, Man Ray, Mads Perch, Jake HIcks.)
    Vocabulary:
    formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Aperture, shutter speed, ISO overexposed, underexposed, macro, foreground / background, High dynamic range, low dynamic range, High Key, Low Key.
    Techniques / processes:
    high key, low key, scanography, collaging, photomontage, use of Photoshop / Pixlr/ Photopea to create effects.
    Links to prior learning:
    Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO, studio lighting techniques, editing techniques, how to analyse, evaluate the work of others and to critically analyse own work.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • Lent Term

    Externally set project as set by examination board AQA. Students focus on developing a mini portfolio of work  Component 2 in response to ONE of the externally suggested titles on the examination paper

    Formal  elements:
    line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme as outlined by AQA. 

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observational shoots relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate photoshoots and experimental images effectively

    AO2
    Experimenting with materials/ photographic methods, techniques and processes in response to own chosen theme, refining ideas as they develop

    AO4
    Making connections with relevant Artists / designers / photographers to inform conclusive work, further experimentation,

    Context: As guided by Examination board; this is broken down by question title.

    Techniques / processes – high, low and mid key photography. Collage, photomontage, digital manipulation techniques, scenography, drawing/ painting into imagery as appropriate to intended outcome 

    Links to prior learning Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO use of vocabulary and structure of shooting logs, how to present and annotate contact sheets clearly,  studio lighting techniques, editing techniques, how to analyse, evaluate the work of others and to critically analyse own work. 

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation

    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • Summer Term until the beginning of May

    Students continue to finalise developmental work in preparation for a 10 hour controlled examination. 

    Formal  elements: line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Subject knowledge and skills

    AO2 / AO4
    Students carry out further experimentational photoshoots, more complex editing techniques and refinement of ideas inspired by their chosen photographic sources.

    Research and practice techniques to be refined during practical examination 

    AO4 Plans / drawings/ notes to design a conclusive response to own chosen theme

    To plan, design and prepare conclusive outcome in stages. 

    Practical examination

    (10 hour period over 2 days)

    Experimenting with further photographic techniques, composition layouts , editing

    Following examination

    Students create a personal, written response to chosen theme containing written analysis and evaluation of practical experiments.

    Links to prior learning Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO use of vocabulary and structure of shooting logs, how to present and annotate contact sheets clearly,  studio lighting techniques, editing techniques, how to analyse, evaluate the work of others and to critically analyse own work.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation

    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others


A level Art and Design Overview

The suite of art and design subjects offered at A Level are Fine Art, Graphic Communication and Photography Students are introduced to a variety of experiences that explore a range of fine art, photographic and graphic media, processes and techniques. They are made aware of both traditional and new media. Students explore the use of drawing for different purposes, using a variety of methods and media on a variety of scales. Students use sketchbooks/workbooks/journals to underpin their work where appropriate. Students explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art and design, photographic and graphics from the past and from recent times, including European and non-European examples. This is integral to the investigating and making processes. Students' responses to these examples are shown through practical and critical activities that demonstrate their understanding of different styles, genres and traditions.

Students will be aware of the four assessment objectives to be demonstrated in the context of the content and skills presented. They are made aware of the importance of process as well as product. Students address and are assessed on four main areas of enquiry which are linked to and extend on the assessment criteria in KS4. In depth artist research and analysis (AO1), artistic competency in a variety of media (AO3), development of ideas based on prior research (AO2), and personal response both written and visual (AO4). These four inter-related assessment objectives are used to build the knowledge and skills required for artist appreciation and practice. The A Level curriculum aims to build on the complexity of art and materials, and skills and knowledge, while beginning to challenge and expand on students’ ability to work independently and identify their individual style and voice, harnessing independent and collaborative work, presentational skills, resilience, the proficiency in industry based software, research and analytical skills as well as competency Students are exposed to creative career opportunities and where appropriate, galleries and workshops with practitioners. In Photography, there is an element of overlap with year 10 scheme of learning to account for students who haven’t studied the subject at GCSE Level; this small element and introduction to the course also acts as a refresher for those students having previously studies photography at GCSE.

Year 12 Fine Art Topics
  • September to October

    Introduction to course covering examples of coursework and appropriate theme development. (AO1,AO3)

    Formal Elements
    line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Processes 

    Students explore a range of artistic techniques and processes that they will include within their personal theme. This is achieved via a workshop delivery in order to practice and renew appropriate skills and techniques.

    Students learn how to record ideas, analyse work or others, document and create work within a sketchbook. 

    Vocabulary –  formal elements, Composition, analysis
    Techniques / processes - Students explore a range of techniques and processes that they will include within their personal theme. This is achieved via a workshop delivery in order to practice and renew appropriate skills and techniques.
    Links to prior learning: Knowledge of Colour Theory, composition, Practical techniques.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation

    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • Lent Term

    influences to support a personal investigation. (AO1,AO2,AO3) 

    Subtheme Enquiry question –Students focus on developing observational studies based on a subtheme inspired by STILL LIFE or PORTRAITURE Students will work from a range of primary and Secondary sources.  Students will present a proposal of individual theme and subthemes to investigate.

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme – investigation into the work of selected artists.

    • Contextual studies
    • Written proposals
    • Initial research into chosen theme and subtheme
    • Artist and photographer analysis 

    AO2
    Refine ideas using a variety of techniques relevant to own theme as directed by staff. Experimenting with materials/ methods, techniques and processes in response to own chosen theme, refining ideas as they develop.

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation studies relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate and analyse own work and that of chosen influences.

    Context; Students to research artists appropriate to their individual project.

    Vocabulary – formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Composition, Scale, 

    Techniques / processes -  Pencil, pen, Monoprint, collage, paint, Photoshop, Multi Media

    Links to prior learning Knowledge of Formal elements, Colour theory, Composition, Scale

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation

    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • Summer Term

    Students will continue to respond COMPONENT 1 and use appropriate influences to support a personal investigation. (AO1,AO2,AO3) 

    Subtheme Enquiry question –Students focus on refining and developing experimental studies based on a subtheme inspired by STILL LIFE or PORTRAITURE Students will work from a range of primary and Secondary sources.

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme – investigation into the work of selected artists.

    AO2
    Refine ideas using a variety of techniques relevant to own theme as directed by staff. Experimenting with materials/ methods, techniques and processes in response to own chosen theme, refining ideas as they develop.

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observation studies relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate and analyse own work and that of chosen influences.

    Context; Students to research artists appropriate to their individual project.

    Vocabulary – formal elements, (line, shape, tone, form, texture, pattern) Composition, Scale,

    Techniques / processes -  Pencil, pen, Monoprint, collage, paint, Photoshop, Multi Media

    Links to prior learning Knowledge of Formal elements, Colour theory, Composition, Scale

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation

    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

Year 12 Photography Topics
  • Autumn Term

    Introduction to photography covering the basic introduction to digital photography composition rules, symbols and hidden meanings and messages, image capture and more technical aspects of photography covering mechanics of Aperture, shutter speed, ISO and white balance.  Students cover History of photography and digital editing techniques.

    Enquiry question – what is photography?

    Formal  elements: line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Subject knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Students learn and research into;
    What is photography?
    Formal elements of photography
    Types of photography
    Composition rules used within photography (and their
    Students learn how to record ideas and document and create work within a sketchbook

    AO3
    Basics of image capture/ observation using composition rules (close ups, MACRO photography, silhouettes) Mind mapping themes (The environment)

    How construct shooting logs to explain ideas / purpose of photographic shoots

    How to annotate contact sheets and to present these clearly

    AO2
    Basics of image manipulation / editing

    Context: Teacher discretion and preferred photographic references,

    Vocabulary –  formal elements, Composition, aperture, shutter speed, white balance, macro photography, long shutter speed, ISO, silhouette, positive/ negative space, symbolism, representation

    Techniques / processes -  use of digital camera and scanner to create images

    Links to prior learning: Knowledge of Colour Theory, composition, positive / negative space

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation

    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • Lent Term until February Half Term

    Students are introduced to studio photographic techniques featured within portraiture photography and work to create experimental work using measured lighting techniques.

    Students experiment with portraiture and social documentary photography within in and outdoor settings.

    Students become proficient in experimental, more complex digital editing techniques.

    Enquiry question – How are portraits captured within photography?

    Formal  elements: line, shape, tone, form, colour, pattern, texture

    Subject knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Students learn and research into meanings and messages within portraiture photography

    How composition is used to communicate meanings messages within photography

    AO3
    Students demonstrate understanding by carrying out a series of own experimental photoshoots based on theme of portraiture

    AO2   
    Students  carry out  a series of experimental  portraiture photoshoots based on studio and outdoor techniques

    Students acquire skills in annotation and evaluation of photoshoots and learn how to refine ideas and develop them further.

    Students cover basic and more complex photo editing techniques using software such as Pixlr, Fotor and Photoshop and editing techniques. 

    Techniques / processes -  use of digital camera, film camera, variety of lenses and  scanner to create experimental images

    Links to prior learning: Knowledge of Colour Theory, composition, positive / negative space technical aspects of aperture, shutter speed and ISO.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation

    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

  • February Half Term To Summer Term

    Students are introduced to component 1 “personal investigation” Student develop own line of research enquiry. Students work on  Individual design briefs, devise and plan their own learning and developmental journey  acquiring the following skills;

    AO1
    Contextual studies
    Written proposals
    Initial research into chosen theme and subtheme
    Artist and photographer analysis

    AO 2 / 3
    Mind mapping initial ideas and creating a series of experimental observational photoshoots based on own chosen theme.

    Plan, prepare and carry out a series of experimental photoshoots

    Present, annotate and evaluate shooting logs and evaluate shoots based on own theme refining ideas and experiments as work develops.

Year 13 Photography Topics
  • Autumn Term

    Students continue to develop and refine developmental work for Component 1 “personal investigation” 

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1 / AO4
    Students carry out more in depth research into Artistic / photographic influences to inform. Students carry out gallery visits to source references to influence and inform practical work.

    AO2/AO3
    Students carry out further, more refined practical photoshoot and experiments related to own personal investigation.

    Techniques / processes – high, low and mid key photography. Collage, photomontage, digital manipulation techniques, scanography, Bleaching, drawing/ painting into, distressing imagery as appropriate. Into imagery as appropriate to intended outcome

    Links to prior learning Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO use of vocabulary and structure of shooting logs, how to present and annotate contact sheets clearly,  studio lighting techniques, more complex editing techniques, how to analyse, evaluate the work of others and to critically analyse own work.

  • Lent Term

    Externally set project Component 2 as set by Examination board AQA.  Students focus on developing a mini portfolio of work in response to ONE of the externally suggested titles on the examination paper

    Subject Knowledge and skills

    AO1
    Research, analysis and evaluation of relevant contextual sources related to students own chosen theme as outlined by AQA.

    AO3
    Students record ideas, thoughts, notes and observational shoots relative to own personal theme, Students acquire further skills to annotate photoshoots and experimental images effectively

    AO2
    Experimenting with materials/ photographic methods, techniques and processes in response to own chosen theme, refining ideas as they develop

    AO4
    Making connections with relevant Artists / designers / photographers to inform conclusive work, further, more refined experimentation.

    Context: As guided by Examination board; this is broken down by question title.

    Techniques / processes – high, low and mid key photography. Collage, photomontage, digital manipulation techniques, scanography, drawing/ painting into imagery as appropriate to intended outcome

    Links to prior learning Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO use of vocabulary and structure of shooting logs, how to present and annotate contact sheets clearly,  studio lighting techniques, more complex editing techniques, how to analyse, evaluate the work of others and to critically analyse own work.

  • Summer Term To Beginning of May

    Students continue to finalise developmental work in preparation for a 15 hour controlled practical examination.

    Subject knowledge and skills

    AO2 / AO4
    Students carry out further experimentational photoshoots, more complex editing techniques and refinement of ideas inspired by their chosen photographic sources.

    Research and practice techniques to be refined during practical examination

    AO4 Plans / drawings/ notes to design a conclusive response to own chosen theme for component 2

    To plan, design and prepare conclusive outcome in stages

    Practical examination

    (15 hour period over 3 days)

    Experimenting with further photographic techniques, composition layouts, complex editing techniques in order to reach a set of conclusive imagery which answers the chosen brief.

    Following examination

    Students create a personal, written response to chosen theme containing detailed written analysis and evaluation of practical experiments and comparison between contextual references.

    Links to prior learning
    Knowledge of composition rules in photography, Colour theory, types of photography, aperture, shutter speed and ISO use of vocabulary and structure of shooting logs, how to present and annotate contact sheets clearly,  studio lighting techniques, editing techniques, how to analyse, evaluate the work of others and to critically analyse own work and that of other photographers.

    Skills of Judgement, analysis and Evaluation
    Evaluate own work and of others; perceptive evaluation when reviewing strengths, development needs and actions; make informed creative actions in response to own critical analysis and that of others.

St Mary's Catholic Academy

Head Teacher: Mr. Simon Eccles
St. Walburga's Road, Blackpool, FY3 7EQ
01253 396286
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Blessed Edward Bamber Catholic Multi Academy Trust

CEO: Mrs. Helen O'Neill
St. Walburga's Road, Blackpool, FY3 7EQ
01253 396286
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www.bebcmat.co.uk
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